Teaching Python

An ex-colleague from HQ introduced me to Trinket: a useful web-based code editor that allows students to tinker with codes and showcase their work. Here’s an example of a BMI calculator that can be embedded via iframes.

As I am teaching programming to the lower sec IP students this term as part of their Skills and Knowledge curriculum, I was wondering if I should use this to ask my students to submit their work.

Angular velocity

This GeoGebra app shows how angular velocity ω is the rate of change of angular displacement (i.e. $\omega=\dfrac{\theta}{t}$) and is dependent on the speed and radius of the object in circular motion (i.e. $v=r\omega$).

Students can explore the relationships by doing the following:

Keeping r constant and varying ω.

Keeping ω constant and varying r.

Keeping v constant by varying r and ω.

Angular displacement

This GeoGebra app shows the relationship s = .

One activity I get students can do is to look at the value of θ when the arc length s is equal to the radius r. This would give the definition of the radian, which is the angle subtended at the centre of a circle by an arc equal in length to its radius.

Mathematics defines the constant π as the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. This can also be shown in the app, although you need to drag the moving point to a point just short of one full revolution.

Creating a simple interactive using GeoGebra

While preparing to share with some fellow teachers in Singapore about the use of GeoGebra in Physics, I came up with a set of simple instructions to create an interactive, while introducing tools such as sliders, checkboxes (along with boolean values) and input boxes. Download it here.

You should be able to follow the instructions in the pdf document above and make a simple interactive applet yourself too. The outcome of the interactive applet will be like this:

Using Google Spreadsheet to obtain best-fit line

I am taking the opportunity (since my students are all doing home-based learning) to teach them how to use spreadsheets to do calculations and to obtain a best-fit line. While they can still submit graph work using PDF scanning apps such as Office Lens and Camscanner into Google Classroom for me to mark, they can make use of the spreadsheet-generated graph to check their results.

Even though for exams, we still require them to plot the points on paper and obtain the gradient and intercept from points on the best-fit line, nobody is going to do so when they start working. So I might as well teach them now.

Due to the lack of face-to-face time, I made this step-by-step video showing them how to do so.

Best-fit Line

For lab work, students often have to estimate a line of best fit for their data points manually. It takes a bit of practice to get it right. With this app, students can generate data points with varying types of scatter and predict their own best-fit line before comparing it with a computer generated one based on the least mean square method.