magnetic braking

Braking of a Magnetic Pendulum with Copper Plate

In this video, we will observe how induced eddy currents in a copper plate slow down a magnetic pendulum. 

When the pendulum is set in motion, it usually oscillates for quite a while. This pendulum consists of a strong magnet.

If we slide a copper plate underneath the magnet while it is in motion, the magnet comes to a stop quickly. Note that copper is not a ferromagnetic material, which means it does not get attracted to a stationary magnet.

As the magnet moves across an area on the copper plate, the change in magnetic flux induces eddy currents on the plate. These eddy currents flow in such a way as to repel the magnet as it approaches the plate and attracts the magnet as it leaves the plate, therefore slowing the magnetic pendulum.

Lenz's law explaining electromagnetic braking of a magnetic pendulum.

When we pull the copper sheet out from under a stationary magnetic pendulum, the eddy currents will flow in such a way that it becomes attracted to the copper sheet.

Moving the copper sheet to and fro at a certain frequency (the pendulum’s natural frequency), the magnetic pendulum can be made to oscillate again.